givemehappypill:

A photo I took in the lovely old town of Saarburg in Germany, where there is a waterfall in the middle of the pedestrian area. 

(via tenderly-totallly-tragically)

archatlas:

Dust Nadav Kander
“For Dust Nadav Kander photographed the desolated landscapes of the Aral Sea and captured fascinating images of the restricted military zones of Priozersk and Kurtchatov, which did not appear on any map until well after the end of the Cold War. Long-distance missiles were tested in Priozersk under great secrecy. Hundreds of atomic bombs were detonated in the so-called Poly­gon near Kurchatov until the program ended in 1989. The bombs were exploded in a remote but still popu­lated area, and covert studies were made of the ef­fects of the radiation on the unsuspecting inhabi­tants. Kander writes how the ticking of the Geiger counter on his belt while he photographed reminded him that he should not become too enthralled with the aesthetic and painterly allure of the crumbling ruins.” Text via. archatlas:

Dust Nadav Kander
“For Dust Nadav Kander photographed the desolated landscapes of the Aral Sea and captured fascinating images of the restricted military zones of Priozersk and Kurtchatov, which did not appear on any map until well after the end of the Cold War. Long-distance missiles were tested in Priozersk under great secrecy. Hundreds of atomic bombs were detonated in the so-called Poly­gon near Kurchatov until the program ended in 1989. The bombs were exploded in a remote but still popu­lated area, and covert studies were made of the ef­fects of the radiation on the unsuspecting inhabi­tants. Kander writes how the ticking of the Geiger counter on his belt while he photographed reminded him that he should not become too enthralled with the aesthetic and painterly allure of the crumbling ruins.” Text via. archatlas:

Dust Nadav Kander
“For Dust Nadav Kander photographed the desolated landscapes of the Aral Sea and captured fascinating images of the restricted military zones of Priozersk and Kurtchatov, which did not appear on any map until well after the end of the Cold War. Long-distance missiles were tested in Priozersk under great secrecy. Hundreds of atomic bombs were detonated in the so-called Poly­gon near Kurchatov until the program ended in 1989. The bombs were exploded in a remote but still popu­lated area, and covert studies were made of the ef­fects of the radiation on the unsuspecting inhabi­tants. Kander writes how the ticking of the Geiger counter on his belt while he photographed reminded him that he should not become too enthralled with the aesthetic and painterly allure of the crumbling ruins.” Text via. archatlas:

Dust Nadav Kander
“For Dust Nadav Kander photographed the desolated landscapes of the Aral Sea and captured fascinating images of the restricted military zones of Priozersk and Kurtchatov, which did not appear on any map until well after the end of the Cold War. Long-distance missiles were tested in Priozersk under great secrecy. Hundreds of atomic bombs were detonated in the so-called Poly­gon near Kurchatov until the program ended in 1989. The bombs were exploded in a remote but still popu­lated area, and covert studies were made of the ef­fects of the radiation on the unsuspecting inhabi­tants. Kander writes how the ticking of the Geiger counter on his belt while he photographed reminded him that he should not become too enthralled with the aesthetic and painterly allure of the crumbling ruins.” Text via. archatlas:

Dust Nadav Kander
“For Dust Nadav Kander photographed the desolated landscapes of the Aral Sea and captured fascinating images of the restricted military zones of Priozersk and Kurtchatov, which did not appear on any map until well after the end of the Cold War. Long-distance missiles were tested in Priozersk under great secrecy. Hundreds of atomic bombs were detonated in the so-called Poly­gon near Kurchatov until the program ended in 1989. The bombs were exploded in a remote but still popu­lated area, and covert studies were made of the ef­fects of the radiation on the unsuspecting inhabi­tants. Kander writes how the ticking of the Geiger counter on his belt while he photographed reminded him that he should not become too enthralled with the aesthetic and painterly allure of the crumbling ruins.” Text via. archatlas:

Dust Nadav Kander
“For Dust Nadav Kander photographed the desolated landscapes of the Aral Sea and captured fascinating images of the restricted military zones of Priozersk and Kurtchatov, which did not appear on any map until well after the end of the Cold War. Long-distance missiles were tested in Priozersk under great secrecy. Hundreds of atomic bombs were detonated in the so-called Poly­gon near Kurchatov until the program ended in 1989. The bombs were exploded in a remote but still popu­lated area, and covert studies were made of the ef­fects of the radiation on the unsuspecting inhabi­tants. Kander writes how the ticking of the Geiger counter on his belt while he photographed reminded him that he should not become too enthralled with the aesthetic and painterly allure of the crumbling ruins.” Text via. archatlas:

Dust Nadav Kander
“For Dust Nadav Kander photographed the desolated landscapes of the Aral Sea and captured fascinating images of the restricted military zones of Priozersk and Kurtchatov, which did not appear on any map until well after the end of the Cold War. Long-distance missiles were tested in Priozersk under great secrecy. Hundreds of atomic bombs were detonated in the so-called Poly­gon near Kurchatov until the program ended in 1989. The bombs were exploded in a remote but still popu­lated area, and covert studies were made of the ef­fects of the radiation on the unsuspecting inhabi­tants. Kander writes how the ticking of the Geiger counter on his belt while he photographed reminded him that he should not become too enthralled with the aesthetic and painterly allure of the crumbling ruins.” Text via. archatlas:

Dust Nadav Kander
“For Dust Nadav Kander photographed the desolated landscapes of the Aral Sea and captured fascinating images of the restricted military zones of Priozersk and Kurtchatov, which did not appear on any map until well after the end of the Cold War. Long-distance missiles were tested in Priozersk under great secrecy. Hundreds of atomic bombs were detonated in the so-called Poly­gon near Kurchatov until the program ended in 1989. The bombs were exploded in a remote but still popu­lated area, and covert studies were made of the ef­fects of the radiation on the unsuspecting inhabi­tants. Kander writes how the ticking of the Geiger counter on his belt while he photographed reminded him that he should not become too enthralled with the aesthetic and painterly allure of the crumbling ruins.” Text via. archatlas:

Dust Nadav Kander
“For Dust Nadav Kander photographed the desolated landscapes of the Aral Sea and captured fascinating images of the restricted military zones of Priozersk and Kurtchatov, which did not appear on any map until well after the end of the Cold War. Long-distance missiles were tested in Priozersk under great secrecy. Hundreds of atomic bombs were detonated in the so-called Poly­gon near Kurchatov until the program ended in 1989. The bombs were exploded in a remote but still popu­lated area, and covert studies were made of the ef­fects of the radiation on the unsuspecting inhabi­tants. Kander writes how the ticking of the Geiger counter on his belt while he photographed reminded him that he should not become too enthralled with the aesthetic and painterly allure of the crumbling ruins.” Text via. archatlas:

Dust Nadav Kander
“For Dust Nadav Kander photographed the desolated landscapes of the Aral Sea and captured fascinating images of the restricted military zones of Priozersk and Kurtchatov, which did not appear on any map until well after the end of the Cold War. Long-distance missiles were tested in Priozersk under great secrecy. Hundreds of atomic bombs were detonated in the so-called Poly­gon near Kurchatov until the program ended in 1989. The bombs were exploded in a remote but still popu­lated area, and covert studies were made of the ef­fects of the radiation on the unsuspecting inhabi­tants. Kander writes how the ticking of the Geiger counter on his belt while he photographed reminded him that he should not become too enthralled with the aesthetic and painterly allure of the crumbling ruins.” Text via.

archatlas:

Dust Nadav Kander

For Dust Nadav Kander photographed the desolated landscapes of the Aral Sea and captured fascinating images of the restricted military zones of Priozersk and Kurtchatov, which did not appear on any map until well after the end of the Cold War. Long-distance missiles were tested in Priozersk under great secrecy. Hundreds of atomic bombs were detonated in the so-called Poly­gon near Kurchatov until the program ended in 1989. The bombs were exploded in a remote but still popu­lated area, and covert studies were made of the ef­fects of the radiation on the unsuspecting inhabi­tants. Kander writes how the ticking of the Geiger counter on his belt while he photographed reminded him that he should not become too enthralled with the aesthetic and painterly allure of the crumbling ruins.” Text via.

archatlas:

Cruising Parks Carlos Aires archatlas:

Cruising Parks Carlos Aires archatlas:

Cruising Parks Carlos Aires archatlas:

Cruising Parks Carlos Aires archatlas:

Cruising Parks Carlos Aires
archatlas:

Abandoned Soviet Factory Nikolai archatlas:

Abandoned Soviet Factory Nikolai archatlas:

Abandoned Soviet Factory Nikolai archatlas:

Abandoned Soviet Factory Nikolai archatlas:

Abandoned Soviet Factory Nikolai archatlas:

Abandoned Soviet Factory Nikolai archatlas:

Abandoned Soviet Factory Nikolai archatlas:

Abandoned Soviet Factory Nikolai
archatlas:

Cartoonbombing Troqman archatlas:

Cartoonbombing Troqman archatlas:

Cartoonbombing Troqman archatlas:

Cartoonbombing Troqman archatlas:

Cartoonbombing Troqman archatlas:

Cartoonbombing Troqman archatlas:

Cartoonbombing Troqman archatlas:

Cartoonbombing Troqman archatlas:

Cartoonbombing Troqman archatlas:

Cartoonbombing Troqman
archatlas:

Twins House Jarmund/Vigsnæs AS Arkitekter MNAL archatlas:

Twins House Jarmund/Vigsnæs AS Arkitekter MNAL archatlas:

Twins House Jarmund/Vigsnæs AS Arkitekter MNAL archatlas:

Twins House Jarmund/Vigsnæs AS Arkitekter MNAL archatlas:

Twins House Jarmund/Vigsnæs AS Arkitekter MNAL archatlas:

Twins House Jarmund/Vigsnæs AS Arkitekter MNAL
archatlas:

Nicolas Jolly archatlas:

Nicolas Jolly archatlas:

Nicolas Jolly archatlas:

Nicolas Jolly archatlas:

Nicolas Jolly
englishsnow:

 Christian Couteau
englishsnow:

 Christian Couteau
englishsnow:

 Christian Couteau
englishsnow:

 Christian Couteau
englishsnow:

 Christian Couteau
englishsnow:

 Christian Couteau
englishsnow:

 Christian Couteau
englishsnow:

 Christian Couteau
englishsnow:

 Christian Couteau

nature & vintage blog
archatlas:

Wild Concrete Romain Jacquet-Lagreze
"Wild Concrete is a photographic series focusing on a very singular phenomenon happening in Hong Kong. Usually wherever human beings are thriving, they always try to keep in control of their direct environment. But in this bustling city, trees can grow impressively on residential buildings. They are the proof that our control is not ever-lasting and they show us how this very loss of control can bring true beauty. Wild Concrete is about nature taking back, it is a demonstration of the tenacity of life in our urban environment." archatlas:

Wild Concrete Romain Jacquet-Lagreze
"Wild Concrete is a photographic series focusing on a very singular phenomenon happening in Hong Kong. Usually wherever human beings are thriving, they always try to keep in control of their direct environment. But in this bustling city, trees can grow impressively on residential buildings. They are the proof that our control is not ever-lasting and they show us how this very loss of control can bring true beauty. Wild Concrete is about nature taking back, it is a demonstration of the tenacity of life in our urban environment." archatlas:

Wild Concrete Romain Jacquet-Lagreze
"Wild Concrete is a photographic series focusing on a very singular phenomenon happening in Hong Kong. Usually wherever human beings are thriving, they always try to keep in control of their direct environment. But in this bustling city, trees can grow impressively on residential buildings. They are the proof that our control is not ever-lasting and they show us how this very loss of control can bring true beauty. Wild Concrete is about nature taking back, it is a demonstration of the tenacity of life in our urban environment." archatlas:

Wild Concrete Romain Jacquet-Lagreze
"Wild Concrete is a photographic series focusing on a very singular phenomenon happening in Hong Kong. Usually wherever human beings are thriving, they always try to keep in control of their direct environment. But in this bustling city, trees can grow impressively on residential buildings. They are the proof that our control is not ever-lasting and they show us how this very loss of control can bring true beauty. Wild Concrete is about nature taking back, it is a demonstration of the tenacity of life in our urban environment." archatlas:

Wild Concrete Romain Jacquet-Lagreze
"Wild Concrete is a photographic series focusing on a very singular phenomenon happening in Hong Kong. Usually wherever human beings are thriving, they always try to keep in control of their direct environment. But in this bustling city, trees can grow impressively on residential buildings. They are the proof that our control is not ever-lasting and they show us how this very loss of control can bring true beauty. Wild Concrete is about nature taking back, it is a demonstration of the tenacity of life in our urban environment." archatlas:

Wild Concrete Romain Jacquet-Lagreze
"Wild Concrete is a photographic series focusing on a very singular phenomenon happening in Hong Kong. Usually wherever human beings are thriving, they always try to keep in control of their direct environment. But in this bustling city, trees can grow impressively on residential buildings. They are the proof that our control is not ever-lasting and they show us how this very loss of control can bring true beauty. Wild Concrete is about nature taking back, it is a demonstration of the tenacity of life in our urban environment." archatlas:

Wild Concrete Romain Jacquet-Lagreze
"Wild Concrete is a photographic series focusing on a very singular phenomenon happening in Hong Kong. Usually wherever human beings are thriving, they always try to keep in control of their direct environment. But in this bustling city, trees can grow impressively on residential buildings. They are the proof that our control is not ever-lasting and they show us how this very loss of control can bring true beauty. Wild Concrete is about nature taking back, it is a demonstration of the tenacity of life in our urban environment."

archatlas:

Wild Concrete Romain Jacquet-Lagreze

"Wild Concrete is a photographic series focusing on a very singular phenomenon happening in Hong Kong. Usually wherever human beings are thriving, they always try to keep in control of their direct environment. But in this bustling city, trees can grow impressively on residential buildings. They are the proof that our control is not ever-lasting and they show us how this very loss of control can bring true beauty. Wild Concrete is about nature taking back, it is a demonstration of the tenacity of life in our urban environment."

archatlas:

Memory Suitcases Yuval Yairi archatlas:

Memory Suitcases Yuval Yairi archatlas:

Memory Suitcases Yuval Yairi archatlas:

Memory Suitcases Yuval Yairi archatlas:

Memory Suitcases Yuval Yairi